Category Archives: News

ITG Helps with a Creative Classroom

We're glad to see Professor Elihu Rubin’s thoughtful use of technology in his pedagogy getting some notice. Late in the spring, Professor Rubin's work on Interactive Crown Street caught some news, and a couple weeks back (don't ask us how we missed it) there an item appeared in Yale News about his investigation with students into New Haven's infrastructure. Professor Rubin and the students in the cross-listed Architecture and Political Science course created an online guide by using Yale's Academic Commons, an instance of WordPress founded and managed by the Instructional Technology Group. Pam Patterson of ITG as well as Ed Kairiss and Edward O'Neill of Educational Technologies supported the course.

Five Takeaways from ELI 2014 in New Orleans

An academic IT conference in New Orleans begs to be told as a story.

But those stories are mostly about good food and good company. (Beignets!)

The actual "what I learned at ELI 2014" squeezes nicely into a list––or rather, a table.

I personally found five presentations (panels, presentations, poster sessions) compelling. Happily, some of the most expert presenters generously shared their visuals--as Powerpoints or PDF's.

Five Presentations and Some Resources

ONE

{title} Extreme Makeover - Course Edition:
Inspiring Faculty to Innovate and Collaborate in Instructional Design
{what it was} SFSU instructional designers created a course-redesign program
to efficiently support 25 faculty at a time.
{why it's cool} Staff used a robust and appealing instructional design process for the faculty workshop itself. It wasn't a question of telling faculty how to teach; rather, the staff actually gave the instructors a positive learning experience and the means to transfer that experience to their own courses.
{the files} The Workshop Process.The Faculty Takeaways.

TWO

{title} Google Glass: Implications for Teaching and Learning in Music and Digital Storytelling
{what it was} Two different use cases of Google Glass in higher education: one liberal arts, one for professional education (communication studies and orchestral conducting, respectively).
{why it's cool} The two use cases seem indicative of broad types of education (liberal arts vs. professional training), and so though the cases are specific, the implications seem broad.

  • The liberal arts use of Google Glass involves capturing video of first-person experience and then subjecting it to critical thought and reflection through the process of editing––much as one does with prose writing.
  • The professional education use of Google Glass involves allowing the neophyte's POV to be captured via video and then subject to critique, analysis and supportive mentoring by an expert.
{the files} A Liberal Arts Use Case.[As of writing, the Professional Education Use Case PPT was not posted.]

THREE

{title} Diving Deep into Data: Motivations, Perceptions, and Learning in Minnesota MOOCs
{what it was} Careful analysis discloses that MOOC users fall into two groups: grazers and strivers. Strivers work hard to overcome the inherent obstacles of the format. But English language skills are an important pre-requisite, and their lack is one of the biggest obstacles to learner success in a MOOC.
{why it's cool} Careful data collection around MOOCs can actually tell us something about who benefits––so we can make inferences about why and even plan the broad distribution of educational materials accordingly.
{the files} The Powerpoint.

FOUR

{title} Assessing Student Learning through the Use of Digital Video and Data Mining
{what it was} "Real-Time Mining of Student Notes and Questions" by Perry J. Samson, a meteorology professor. Samson showed how the LectureTools application let him build assessment into his classroom presentations so he could determine what teaching students needed.
{why it's cool} The instructor can "assess as he goes," and the students can review material later, including taking their own notes and sharing notes.
{the files} As of writing, the PPT was not shared.

FIVE

{title} Moving Math Online: Technology Solutions
{what it was} A straightforward workflow for creating online learning materialsthat include handwritten equations.
{why it's cool} The approach supports many technologies.
{the files} The Tool Handout.

Bright Shiny Objects at ELI 2014

Yesterday, I returned from the 2014 ELI Annual Meeting. For many reasons, I'm highly ambivalent about this conference, starting with the appellation.

"Annual meeting" feels like a corporate shareholder meeting, though I'll allow that they may have been just trying to get away from calling it a conference or symposium or what-have-you. As well, I understand that the association conducts business at and through this event. However, the name also speaks to a broader sense I have about ELI that there's not sufficient thought put into evaluating how the conference transpires.

The last time I went, in 2012, for instance, there was an official backchannel run through something other than Twitter. Silly, even way back then. This year, one of the sessions had a topic that was to be "crowdsourced". Some people I talked to hadn't heard of the session and the chance to vote on a topic, the topic wasn't (ever?) announced, and when I went to the room at the appointed time there were all of two people there. Similarly, I had major headaches getting on the hotel wireless network after the first day, but between not needing it for long enough to bother solving the issue and having an adequate connection through my phone, I didn't discover until my last day that the password had been changed. Though I'm on Twitter nearly constantly during conferences, it's possible I just missed the notice, but I don't think so.

Beyond the logistical issues, ELI has always felt very tech-deterministic. Until going to a session from the wonderful Gardner Campbell, I heard nearly nothing about the personal, emotional, affective side of things.

Even there, it was in a chimera session (you can hear me ask about it during the Q&A once the session recording is available sometime in early May) that paired him with a duo talking about the details of LTI integration and ed tech interop standards. He was kind enough to not insist I declare my thoughts on the matter, and did his best to describe the connections between the parts. Just the same, his talk felt more like the conference I wish I had gone to and the second half more like the conference I got.

Some more small parts:
• Applause goes to the ELI organizers for having a hands-on Arduino workshop. I've wanted to try this out for quite a while, but never had the right opportunity. On the other hand, why weren't we allowed to take the kits home with us? If ELI paid anything like retail for the kits, it still would have only been $2000. Not chicken feed, but several of us felt a little deceived. Others suggested the kits might be going to charity; this would be a fantastic idea, but ELI should have communicated that if so.

• ELI didn't organize any social events. In this case, I'm not concerned whether ELI were to underwrite attendees social interaction financially, but it seems like something that would benefit the organization.

• Predictably, there was some confusion at some points whether the Twitter hashtag was #ELI14 or #ELI2014. Eventually, #ELI14 seemed to struggle to be a space for people to say things publicly yet not in the official record.

Strangely enough, later the conversation on the main hashtag got affected by the alternate universe.

• The app provided by EDUCAUSE worked very well for me, letting me see the whole schedule, mark sessions that interested me, aggregate my marked sessions into a separate agenda, and evaluate the sessions. Really nice. Except that the alerts in the app were extremely sparse and late and therefore not useful. This would have been the place to put notice of the hotel wifi password change, as a makerspace session cancellation was, but nothing. I can't comment on other features of the app, since I only used the schedule and alerts on advice from a colleague who attended the big EDUCAUSE in the fall.

• Good sessions I attended: "Rapid Evaluations of Emerging Instructional Technologies", "Experiential Ed Models", "How Do You Know If Your Faculty Development Program Is Effective?", "Google Glass", and Gardner Campbell's part of "Learning Design, Objects, and Tools".

• Finally, my strongest ambivalence comes from the continued emphasis on specific tools as the solutions to general problems and from the continued absence of context emphasis. Over and over, I got the sense that presentations started with the use of a tool and — fiat lux — showed how it could help you, too, lose weight, grow hair, retain students, improve efficiency, and reduce cost. Oh, and scale up. Believe me, I deplore the pressure to make public profession of an article of faith: "Technology shalt not lead pedagogy, but rather the other way around." If we in academic technology are so distrusted by pedagogues (some of whom are us), the problem is in our practices, not in our rhetoric. And yet there we were in New Orleans talking about how this or that tool allowed us to address a problem, explore a new approach, save higher education from extinction. This is a blog post in itself, but it feels a bit like we've been bamboozled by the bright shiny objects we are supposed to understand better than most, prestidigitated into thinking that [object N] is the thing, when something always on your head is better framed as something like "posthuman computing" or "wearable computing" or "physiology-integrated technology". I'd love to see ELI as an organization consider these issues when assembling the next annual meeting slate of presenters.

ELI 2014 - intuition rules

Are there rules to intuition? One rule emerging from the study of the brain is that the mind needs to allow the "brain voices" space in order to synthesize what was learned.  In the 1990's the LMS was (and can still be) very freeing. It allow students and faculty one spot to share and pass along digital information. But now it binds us to a technology that is a bit dated and doesn't adapt quickly or easily to other platforms. This is the shackle of a silo. That's not to say that all new technologies aren't silos. Case in point, designing an IOS app that must use Apple's SDK and app store and the moment it was written, it is becoming obsolete. Sometimes shackles can be freeing and sometimes a shackle is just a shackle.

One thing about conferences, you hear buzz words. We hear the buzz of innovation and transformation. This has been the battle cry since I started this job 13 years ago. We practice the art of combining lightweight tools to get things done.  Is that innovative? Is it trans-formative? Possibly. But it's less dramatic than that, it's willing to look at the same old same old day after day and suddenly see it in a new combination. In order to do that you have to be willing to work shackled then you have to be willing to break free.

noSilosBuzzword 1: 'connected learning environment' - some use use the term 'learning ecosystem'. It's the holy grail at the moment and one that AIT seems intent on exploring with good reason. No more silo's - creating a community of learning tools that are accessible no matter what the platform. LTI's and mobile apps can help us with this dismantling of silo applications which don't speak to one another.

big-data-straight-aheadBuzzword 2: 'BIG data' - Discussion of data storage and preservation is necessary - it's the mechanics of beast - just like I need a cup to hold liquid. But the question in AIT becomes how do we provide access, analysis and the "brain voice" space for students to come to the critical thinking part of learning. We can help students accomplish this by applying "backwards planning" - which in my way of thinking isn't backwards at all. What are the competencies expected? What is the mission and vision of the program/course/discipline? Let's create a concept map - on paper, with a pen OR on a tablet device with a mind map/drawing tool. The mission or the competency is in the middle. OR, rogue thought here, what the student is hoping to gain from the course. Now let that brain voice take over and start using your creativity based on the facts/ideas/tools you know but put them in a new order. Here's a concept map I created at the end of the conference:
IMG_0967

A here is a really cool one from this website (which i didn't know existed!)http://smithsonian-webstrategy.wikispaces.com/ and it's from 2009 - I see a lot of innovative ideas we still wish for today.
conceptMap_processed

How do we tie the connected learner to big data?  What we need are tools for the end user to be able to SEE the data and make their own intuitive best guess about how it all comes together. Do we really want students to use the word research as a way to  merely to spit facts back to the instructor? Or do we want research to mean "this is how I am thinking". I think therefore I research. (see Bret Victor's work here: worrydream.com). And if you get a chance to view the taping of Campbell Gardner's 15 min introduction to Bret Victor's work, it will inspire you. (http://www.educause.edu/eli/events/eli-annual-meeting/program-and-agenda)

Bret Victor speaks about the animation of complex concepts (which can be contained in big data) and the use of interactive personal computing. He says that creation is discovery. If we can provide students with a tool to turn in assignments for a static grade but also a tool that provides a window into their thinking, a place where they can make clear how they come to hold the view/argument they are supporting with those assignments, we will enable a generation of students who reduce abstraction and indirection and pursue passion. It is in this arena of visible and immediate reflection that learning happens.

campfiregirlBuzzword 3: Badges - now I must confess I was a scoffer. Badges brought to mind the small stint I did in Campfire Girls (ah, google it, we sold candy not cookies). We earned badges and stuck them on a sash. It was fun, but what I never really considered what was under each badge. I gained either a skill or it was acknowledged that I participated in something. Those badges said to my peers and my leaders that I had worked at something. Suddenly, I'm sold. Let's say a student is in a course and he passes with a C. If the course had 3 competencies to be gained, it's possible that the C student only learned one. What if students earned badges for each competency with the help of blended learning (buzzword alert) tools: modules, lecture, in-class second screen back channels).

Here's a concept map of second screen back channels I created:
IMG_0968

We can enriched student learning by introducing badges across the curriculum. This provides students with tools to tie their learning together and help them make connections beyond their chosen disciplines. Those badges can be mined by potential employers who are searching for specific competencies. Badges can also be related to ePortfolio's in a meaningful way - the ePortfolio (buzzword) can show tangible digital evidence of a learned competency. If we provide students with areas for reflection and blocks of obtainable goals, we will increase their potential for learning. Many of these buzzwords are from listening to Kyle Bowen, Director of Informatics at Purdue University and his featured session on "Four Big Ideas for What's Next." I really enjoyed his talk. It pulled some many things in the conference together for me and had a tone of practicality that I appreciated.

The ideal student will become a systems thinker, a communicator, a creative problem solver and culturally responsible. We "backwards" construct from this ideal and identify tools that enable/enhance the learning process to help students obtain these goals. I believe that is the trans-formative power of technology enhanced learning - providing tools and incentive that allows digital learners to free up some brain space for creative problem solving.

The conference generated some ideas for me outlined at the following website - I encourage you to login to that site comment on those ideas and add your own.
http://idea.commons.yale.edu

We've Missed You

Color photo of hand-made origami card reading "welcome back"No, really! It's been great to take a hiatus from blogging for ITG, but it just isn't the same without being able to talk to you. Yes, you. And you, and you, and . . . especially you, there, in the back.

What did you do on your winter recess? We all had a mostly restful time. Some of us left the country to visit family, some of us went farther north in this country and ended up needing to replace a chunk of our car's clutch the day before our birthday. (This second one was not me.) We all disconnected for a little while and are ready to start the term.

What are we seeing on the horizon for this term? For one thing, we're going to start rolling out in this space more information about what's happening with Yale Academic Commons. We haven't done a great job keeping the Yale community using WordPress updated with when we add or retire Themes or Plugins, nor with when we are upgrading the WordPress core and what the major changes are with that core upgrade, and that's going to get better. For another, we're undertaking some strengthening of our group's ability to work in certain areas of contemporary academic technology, most notably GIS. In collaboration with GIS specialist Stacey Maples of the Yale Library, Alina and Trip are going to raise their own skill levels and assemble a small handful of workflow patterns for some kinds of GIS work so that you can incorporate thinking about it more quickly and easily into your pedagogy or coursework. Finally, in March we are planning a showcase for some of the work faculty do in their classrooms with mobile devices, primarily iPads. This event will likely take place toward the end of March in the TEAL classroom at 17 Hillhouse Ave., and will give you a chance not only to talk to peers about how they make the most of mobile affordances, but also to try out some mobile devices and consider whether/how you might integrate them into your teaching.

These are just a few of our undertakings for Spring 2014, but we've always got more irons in the fire. We're also always open to hearing what the Yale community thinks is important. What gaps are there in your pedagogy or coursework that academic technology might address? What great tools or processes do you use now that more people should know about? Tell us in the comments or at itg@yale.edu.

[Creative-Commons Licensed Image via Flickr user joybot]

Creating and Supporting "Black Acts"

This is the third in a series of three posts on the digital exhibitions I worked on this spring. If you need to, you can jump back to part two or part one.

It's been a good month and more since I wrote the second of three posts on my springtime of exhibits, and now I've managed to find time for the third. In between, among other things, I went to the Digital Humanities Summer Institute 2013 in beautiful Victoria, British Columbia, about which I will add a post here later. More to the point for this, though, is that I'm pretty sure that the learning I did there will be fruitful as I move forward with the work started on Black Acts, an online digital exhibition for Professor Paige McGinley's African-American Studies / Theater Studies course from spring 2013.

Professor McGinley came to ITG in January of 2011 with an idea for incorporating building a digital exhibit into this spring's instance of her course, titled, simply enough, "African American Theater". As this is Yale's survey course on the matter, she wanted to structure the term by having students focus on a single performer, deeply research that person in the Beinecke Library's James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of African American Arts and Letters, and compose a critical multimedia essay around the objects discovered in the collection and the story they told. In short, the idea was to put the students in the position of a professional scholarly researcher with all the labor and joy that can entail. I represented ITG on the project, whose instructional and support team also included several members of the Beinecke staff, most notably Lisa Conathan, Nancy Kuhl, Susan Brady, and Chris Edwards. (I apologize in advance for not remembering all those at the Beinecke who contributed, as this project would not have been successful without all contributions large and small.)
Continue reading

American Studies Senior Project Exhibit

This is the second in a series of three posts on the digital exhibitions I worked on this spring. If you need to, you can jump back to part one. Part three is up, too.

In April, I gave an update on our Academic Commons in which I referred coyly to a senior project on which I was a technical consultant, and now that it's up and live, I can talk about it a bit less obliquely. (Yale tends to interpret FERPA fairly conservatively, and until it was clear that the student, Charlotte Parker, was going to finish the project and make it publicly visible, I wanted to maintain her anonymity.)

Humanities students don't tend to execute digital projects at Yale, especially not for their senior projects. Certainly, they engage in digital scholarship in a consuming sense by reading primary or secondary sources in technology-mediated ways, engaging in online research, or taking in digital media. In some ways, they are producers as well, but generally only in that baseline way we take for granted, that is by typing their essay on a computer. They may even submit their essays for assessment electronically, but my suspicion is that most will (by requirement or choice) at least backstop that submission with a paper copy.

So it was with real excitement that we accepted a request to work with Charlotte Parker ’13 on her senior project for the American Studies major. Charlotte was strongly influenced in her life by family friends who had connections to the Spanish Civil War and to America writers involved in it, and had been working at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library for some time. These factors joined together in an idea for an online exhibit of Beinecke material related to American writers' search for a way to write the truth(s) that they saw on the ground in Spain as well as related to writing truth in general. As such, Charlotte would have to engage in curation and analysis of a collection of materials and to engage with technological opportunities and restrictions for making her work publicly available.

Our first encounter with Charlotte came as a request for an Academic Commons site and I saw no reason to recapitulate her process of selecting a project environment, so WordPress was our site of investigation. Part of the reason for selecting our Academic Commons as the exhibit tool was that the Beinecke would like to see more student exhibits using their collections (as would many of us), and the existing infrastructure was the easiest slope. As it worked out, it was also a thoroughly appropriate tool, since Charlotte’s focus in her project was going to be less on establishing a metadata-rich repository than on presenting critical writing alongside selected objects. (In the third of this series I'll relate an investigation into an alternate tool representing the metadata-rich branch of possibility.)

In a couple project meetings, Charlotte and I decided that she would play in an Academic Commons site with the knowledge that I could undo anything she needed undone and that she would do some legwork to figure out how she wanted to theme her site. Fortunately, she was participating in a HackYale course on website UX and bootstrapped her research and learning there. As with Academic Commons for the software, there was an intellectual infrastructure present and growing that meant we could focus in the project work on the questions of scholarship and technological implementation. Naturally, this meant also that we didn't take the opportunity to walk through a critical examination of the technology qua technology and discuss how the choices being made affected the argument. For this reason alone, the next time we consult on an independent student project I will do my best to have at least one meeting of everyone significantly involved. No Yale student should graduate without critically examining technology at some point.

An interesting aspect of the project was my indirect partnership with Nancy Kuhl (about whom more in a subsequent post) at the Beinecke, who was Charlotte's work supervisor as well as a mentor for the Beinecke-based research. We never had a team meeting for the project, something that might have been beneficial to Charlotte and something I will agitate for the next time we work similarly with a senior project. At least at some level, I think it would also have benefitted her advisor, me, and Nancy to sit however briefly around a table and have Charlotte walk through the project timeline with us. She was very well organized, as far as I could tell, but even so there was some of the usual flurry of activity hard upon the project submission deadline that would be nice to avoid. (Then again, I tell all students I encounter that a dirty little secret of the work world is that projects are not planned and executed substantially better than college-level projects.)

Springtime Is for Exhibits

This is the first in a series of three posts on the digital exhibitions I worked on this spring. You can jump ahead to part two. Part three is up, too.

Or at least that's the way it felt for me this spring. For one reason or another, my large projects this term ended up being three different forms of gallery and library exhibits, each filled with undergraduate scholarship. I'll discuss each in turn, just because they were each interesting enough that they deserve proper space for consideration.

One that I knew coming into the term I would have was the second instance of something I first worked on in the spring of 2012. Professor Laura Wexler (American Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) is deeply interested in photography and its role in our lives. In particular, she has run since 1999 the Photographic Memory Workshop at Yale and offers a seminar titled "Photography and Memory". You can read my writeup of last year's project, but one thing that I neglected to note then was just how excited we were about this: To our knowledge this way of getting student scholarship into the YUAG was entirely novel and this level of public exposure of undergraduate research is rare. Not all the students last year were undergraduates, and possibly even most were not, but even for graduate students at Yale, short-form scholarship for a general audience is uncommon.

Somewhat predictably, this year's edition was easier in many ways, but because I knew that was likely, I decided to bring things up a bit where I could. Where I noted in last year's writeup that “This kiosk came together in a flurry of effort and coordination,” I conveniently omitted that the recordings were done very much in a duct-tape-and-gum manner. The recordings were done in a spare room in our offices, in our conference room, and in a spare office at Photo + Design. In each case, I used Audacity, a half-decent microphone we have, and was the sole engineer and producer. There's a fog of perfection at Yale that makes doing things this way feel illicit, which is of course one of the attractions. But I also didn't want to bias gallery visitors against the installation just because it wasn't professionally recorded. Consequently, I skipped all mention of that.

This year, the recording process was also how I wanted to focus on ratcheting up the assignment from our perspective. Surely, Yale of all places has a push-button high-quality recording studio for student work? Alas, no. Some of the residential colleges have studios, and good ones, but they are limited to students in those colleges. Doubtlessly, we could have gotten around that requirement, but I've been there and would not have wanted a fellow student using up my college's resources on the down low. Naturally, the School of Music and the Music Department have their own studios, but there again, they are reserved for students in those units. Enter the Yale Broadcast & Media Center studios. All signs pointed to them as the best place to get this done. The one catch, which wasn't one, was that the work we were doing there needed to be disseminated in some way, and since we were doing audio work, we needed to make a podcast out of it. I can't call that a catch, because being pushed to make our work more public is a Good Thing.

This brings me to the major difference from the course side this year, which was that the assignment was baked into the syllabus. Last spring, the assignment was added after the start of the course, and possibly even after registration, which very much threw the students. We can look on the students' reaction more or less charitably, but possibly the most nearly neutral way to see it is that Yale students are very busy, and bristle when they encounter academic surprises. I mention this change at this point in my recap because I believe it is half of why the recording sessions went so smoothly this year. The other half is that we had a proper studio and a proper engineer in Phil Kearney from Broadcast & Media, and the students knew they needed to perform. (It didn't hurt that more than one student had some experience with Yale's student radio outfit, but most did not.) Consequently, most students got their reading done — and done well — in one take. The downside of that was that we spent far too much of the 30-minute slots I had allotted (based on last year's efforts) with time on our hands. I couldn't have asked for a better engineer, though, than Phil, as it wasn't until we had gotten most of the way through the student sessions, with only one reschedule, that he said, “You know, we could just schedule them 5 or 6 at a time and just have the next one go when the previous one is finished.”

So I thank Phil for his skill and his patience, Professor Wexler for doing this assignment again, Davids Odo and Whaples from the YUAG for their work on the image and coordination side, and Thomas Raich of YUAG for going above and beyond in getting this kiosk up and running when driver and OS issues exploded 10 minutes before I was due on a train to Washington, D.C. I look forward to next year and how we can continue to integrate student digital scholarship with cultural institutions on campus.

Postscript

The exhibit is still up in the (gorgeously new) Study Gallery at the YUAG, so if you can, do head over and see it. Neither YUAG IT nor I (nor Professor Wexler) are thrilled with some sloppiness of the touchscreen we needed to use this year, last year's being already allocated for other needs. But if you do go and find the cursor unresponsive, just touch far away from your target and then try again. We've found that tends to be better than repeatedly trying to move the cursor by small increments.

New Seminar Set of iPad 3s

Based on the success of ITG's iPad pilots in Julie Newman's EVST 170 course, Bobbi Stuart's English 116 course, and the WiresCrossed Mobile Tech internship this past academic year, we have added a brand new seminar set of iPad 3s to our mobile technology battalion. What's more - we now have 2 slick and powerful charging and sync carts, called "iPad Learning Labs," that will allow us to image and charge up to 30 iPads in one go! The learning lab carts will make it easier than ever to get apps onto multiple iPads. We are proud to announce that we have 2 seminar sets of iPads - one set of iPad 2s and the brand new iPad 3s.

Please consider submitting a proposal to use the iPads in your course this fall! For more information, please see: iPad Course Loans.

Student Work Kiosk at the Art Gallery

Recently the Yale University Art Gallery installed a touch-screen kiosk populated with work from Professor Laura Wexler's seminar titled "Photography and Memory". For the kiosk, we recorded students reading a short paper (or an excerpt of the same) written in response to one of the photographs displayed in the YUAG's study gallery space as part of this course. Thanks to the YUAG's touchscreen, visitors can browse the kiosk by person or by work to hear the students' scholarship from the seminar. Along with short and full audio files from the student readings, the kiosk presents pictures of the students and the works discussed, as well as transcripts of the readings. This kiosk came together in a flurry of effort and coordination among Professor Wexler, the YUAG, ITG, and the Photo + Design group of ITS. The kiosk will only be up for another couple of weeks, so go take a look today!

students and instructor around the kiosk